• Il est midi, les cloches retentissent dans le village de Louisburgh. Assis dans sa cuisine, Marcus Conway écoute la radio et lit son journal. Soudain, un article amène un souvenir, le passé se mêle au présent, il se rappelle : ses premières années d'homme marié, la naissance de ses enfants, la folie de son père... Pendant une heure, il désosse son passé avec autant de minutie que d'émerveillement. Jusqu'au jour où, sa vie s'est brutalement mise à vaciller.

  • This masterpiece of a novel, narrated in a single sentence, is an international literary sensation. Longlisted for the 2017 Man Booker prize, BGE Irish Book of the Year 2016 and winner of the 2016 Goldsmiths Prize

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  • CROWE'S REQUIEM tells the story of John Crowe, a young man born into a village without any apparent history or contact with the outside world. Coming under the tutelage of his mad, beloved grandfather, Crowe is introduced to an existence he feels compelled to understand but is doomed forever to find elusive and mystifying. Breaking free of the old man's spell - drifting through the city hoping to complete his education - he embarks on a sudden, erotic affair with Marian, a young woman with a broken claim to divinity. Unable to see himself except through a prison of fictions, Crowe's life begins to escape him. Love story and gothic fairy tale, teeming with ghosts, sorcerors and vagrants, CROWE'S REQUIEM is in eerie and treacherous meditation on the nature of storytelling by one of Ireland's finest new writers.

  • Rescued from the squalor of a Romanian orphanage, and adopted by the rural community of west Mayo, J. J. O'Malley should have grown up happy. The boy has no gift for it, though, and his new life has a brutal way of giving him plenty to be unhappy about. After a sudden tragedy, J. J. suffers a catastrophic mental breakdown. Unable to live with himself, he volunteers for an improbable government project which has been set up to explore the possibility of using deep coma as a future option within the EU penal system. When his coma goes online the nation turns to watch, and J. J. is quickly elevated to the status of cultural icon. Sex symbol, existential hero, T-shirt philosopherhis public profile now threatens to obscure the man himself behind a swirl of media profiles, online polls, and EEG tracings.
    Five narratorshis father, neighbour, teacher, public representative, and sweethearttell us the true story of his life and try to give some clue as to why he is the way he is now: floating in a maintained coma on a prison ship off the west coast of Ireland. Brilliantly imagined and artfully constructedmerging science fiction with an affectionate portrait of small town IrelandNotes from a Coma is both the story of a man cursed with guilt and genius and a compassionate examination of how our identities are safeguarded and held in trust by those who love us.

  • WINNER OF THE GOLDSMITHS PRIZE 2016 2016 IRISH BOOK OF THE YEAR Once a year, on All Souls' Day, it is said in Ireland that the dead may return. Solar Bones is the story of one such visit. Marcus Conway, a middle-aged engineer, turns up one afternoon at his kitchen table and considers the events that took him away and then brought him home again. Funny and strange, McCormack's ambitious and other-worldly novel plays with form and defies convention. This profound new work is by one of Ireland's most important contemporary novelists. A beautiful and haunting elegy, this story of order and chaos, love and loss captures how minor decisions ripple into waves and test our integrity every day.

  • Anglais Solar Bones

    Mike McCormack

    Longlisted for the 2017 Man Booker Prize
    Winner of the Goldsmiths Prize
    Winner of the Bord Gáis Energy Irish Book Awards Novel of the Year
    An Irish Times Book Club Choice
    "With stylistic gusto, and in rare, spare, precise and poetic prose, Mike McCormack gets to the music of what is happening all around us. One of the best novels of the year." --Colum McCann, author of Let the Great World Spin and TransAtlantic
    Solar Bones is a masterwork that builds its own style and language one broken line at a time; the result is a visionary accounting of the now.
    A vital, tender, death-haunted work by one of Ireland’s most important contemporary writers, Solar Bones is a celebration of the unexpected beauty of life and of language, and our inescapable nearness to our last end. It is All Souls Day, and the spirit of Marcus Conway sits at his kitchen table and remembers. In flowing, relentless prose, Conway recalls his life in rural Ireland: as a boy and man, father, husband, citizen. His ruminations move from childhood memories of his father’s deftness with machines to his own work as a civil engineer, from transformations in the local economy to the tidal wave of global financial collapse. Conway’s thoughts go still further, outward to the vast systems of time and history that hold us all. He stares down through the “vortex of his being,” surveying all the linked circumstances that combined to bring him into this single moment, and he makes us feel, if only for an instant, all the terror and gratitude that existence inspires.

  • In his second collection of short stories, Mike McCormack joins head and heart in a series of tales that weave a fluid vision of a world morphing between the real and the hyperreal. Amid hollow laughter a prisoner is drawn from his cell in the middle of the night to play a video game; two rural guards ponder the security threat posed by the only man in Ireland not to have written his memoirs; a child tries to offset his destiny as a serial killer by petitioning his father for a beating; a late-night American cop show becomes a savage analysis of a faltering marriage; two men turn up at the door of a slacker to give him news of his death and recruit him to some mysterious surveillance mission; an older brother worries about the health of his younger sibling; the prodigal son returns to reveal the fear and hypocrisy that lie at the heart of his brother's life. In Forensic Songs McCormack's characters find themselves wrestling with their identities in a terrain where love is too often and too easily obscured.

  • This reissue of the author's celebrated 1997 debut collection is augmented with an afterword by the author, who reflects on his success and his work since. Here we enter a world where the infatuation with death, ruin and destruction is total. Set in locations ranging from New York to the west of Ireland, and to the nameless realms of the imagination, it is a world where beautiful but deranged children make lethal bombs, talented sculptors spend careers dismembering themselves in pursuit of their art, and wasters rise up with axes and turn into patricides. While tipping his hat to masters such as Borges and Calvino, Poe and Ballard, Mike McCormack is his own man, and Getting it in the Head is richly imaginative, bitterly funny, powerful and original. This edition includes a new Afterword, in which the author reflects on his early work. Getting it in the Head won the Rooney Prize in 1996, and was voted a New York Times Notable Book of the Year in 1998. Mike McCormack is the author of two novels, Crowe's Requiem (1998), and Notes on a Coma (2005), which was shortlisted for the Irish Book of the Year Award in 2006 and described by John Waters from The Irish Times as 'the greatest Irish novel of the decade just ended'. In 2012 Lilliput published Mike McCormack's latest short story collection Forensic Songs. Praise for Getting it in the Head: 'Remarkable, even at the most extreme moments. The mind, not the emotions, is McCormack's target and these deadly, exact stories score several bulls-eyes.' - Eileen Battersby, The Irish Times 'Funny, fantastical tales that trample on the toes of the twentieth century itself. As for the formal constraints he imposes on himself let's just say that they serve as a rack on which he stretches his nightmares skin tight.' - Michael Upchurch, New York Times McCormack's first collection of short stories ranges from the west of Ireland to New York to Purgatory. Whatever the location, the emotional landscape remains the same: a helpless howl of protest that presages not only the end of the century but the end of civilisation itself. - Times Literary Supplement

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