Sciences & Techniques

  • Anglais The Matchless Six

    Ron Hotchkiss

    It is July 1928, and Canada's first women's Olympic team -- "The Matchless Six" -- is heading to Amsterdam, the site of the ninth Olympiad of the modern era. Canada's finest female track-and-field athletes, having survived rigorous training and the grueling selection process at the Olympic Trials, were determined to take their big talent and big dreams to the top. Meet Jane Bell, Myrtle Cook, Bobbie Rosenfeld, and Ethel Smith, the "Flying Four" who comprised Canada's first relay team; Ethel Catherwood, the "Saskatoon Lily," who became the champion high-jumper and the most photographed female athlete at the Olympic Games; and Jean Thompson, the youngest member of the team at seventeen, who became one of the world's most outstanding middle-distance runners. It was an impressive achievement:
    "A team of six from Canada, a country of less than ten million, competed against 121 athletes from 21 countries, whose total population was 300 million." Impressive indeed.
    For many years, historian Ron Hotchkiss has been fascinated by "The Matchless Six," the conquering heroines who took Amsterdam by storm. His extensive research has led to this riveting account, full of black-and-white archival photographs, of the events leading up to and following that fateful summer in the history of Canadian sport.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • Anglais Champlain

    Christopher Moore

    "One July day four hundred years ago, Samuel de Champlain stepped out of a small boat at Quebec and began a great adventure." So begins Christopher Moore's riveting account of the life of the extraordinary, daring "father of New France."
    Samuel de Champlain helped found the first permanent French settlement in the New World; he established the village that eventually became the great city of Quebec; he was a skilled cartographer who gave us many of our first accurate maps of North America; he forged alliances with Native nations that laid the foundations for vast trading networks; and as governor, he set New France on the road to becoming a productive, self-sufficient, thriving colony.
    But Champlain was also a man who suffered his share of defeats and disappointments. That first permanent settlement was abandoned after a disastrous winter claimed the lives of half the colonists. His marriage to a child bride was unhappy and marked by long separations. Eventually Quebec had to be surrendered temporarily to the English in 1629.
    In this remarkable book, illustrated entirely with paintings, archival maps, and original artifacts, Christopher Moore brings to life this complex man and, through him, creates a portrait of Canada in its earliest days.
    Champlain is illustrated with archival maps and paintings. Additional artwork has been provided by Francis Back.
    From the Hardcover edition.

  • Anglais Rain Tonight

    Steve Pitt

    The weather forecast for the evening of October 15, 1954 was simply "rain tonight." In fact, the hurricane was a devastating one. The storm swept from North Carolina up into Canada. In Toronto, Ontario, the official death count was 81, but it was probably much higher because the many people living in the ravines were not part of the census.
    Penny Doucette was 8 years old on the night the storm raged in Toronto. She, her parents, and their elderly neighbor found themselves clinging to the roof of the house as they watched the house next door float away on the swollen Humber River. Augmenting the dramatic story are illustrations, archival photographs, and fascinating information about hurricanes: their causes, their history, and lore.
    Published for the fiftieth anniversary of Hurricane Hazel, this is a valuable resource for young readers.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

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