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  • Voici venir les rêveurs

    Imbolo Mbue

    Ils ont traversé l'Atlantique pour vivre leur rêve, le vrai, l'américain.
    Originaire du Cameroun, Jende Jonga sait que le sort de sa famille repose sur l'obtention d'un visa de travail. Des études pour sa femme, Neni, un avenir pour son fils, Liomi... Après plusieurs petits boulots clandestins, Jende croit enfin tenir sa chance : un job de chauffeur pour Clark Edwards, riche banquier de Manhattan. Mais nous sommes en 2007, et la crise des subprimes réserve, à tous, un réveil brutal...
    Choc des cultures et quête du bonheur : le rêve que l'on poursuit n'est pas toujours celui qu'on croit...

  • From the celebrated author of the New York Times bestseller Behold the Dreamers comes a sweeping, wrenching story about the collision of a small African village and an American oil company. A novel with the richness and power of a great contemporary fable, and a heroine for our time.--Sigrid Nunez, author of The Friend , winner of the National Book Award We should have known the end was near. So begins Imbolo Mbues powerful second novel, How Beautiful We Were . Set in the fictional African village of Kosawa, it tells of a people living in fear amid environmental degradation wrought by an American oil company. Pipeline spills have rendered farmlands infertile. Children are dying from drinking toxic water. Promises of cleanup and financial reparations to the villagers are made--and ignored. The countrys government, led by a brazen dictator, exists to serve its own interests. Left with few choices, the people of Kosawa decide to fight back. Their struggle will last for decades and come at a steep price. Told from the perspective of a generation of children and the family of a girl named Thula who grows up to become a revolutionary, How Beautiful We Were is a masterful exploration of what happens when the reckless drive for profit, coupled with the ghost of colonialism, comes up against one communitys determination to hold on to its ancestral land and a young womans willingness to sacrifice everything for the sake of her peoples freedom.

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  • A compulsively readable debut novel about marriage, immigration, class, race, and the trapdoors in the American Dream--the unforgettable story of a young Cameroonian couple making a new life in New York just as the Great Recession upends the economy New York Times Bestseller Winner of the PEN/Faulkner Award Longlisted for the PEN/Open Book Award An ALA Notable Book NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY NPR The New York Times Book Review San Francisco Chronicle The Guardian St. Louis Post-Dispatch Chicago Public Library BookPage Refinery29 Kirkus Reviews Jende Jonga, a Cameroonian immigrant living in Harlem, has come to the United States to provide a better life for himself, his wife, Neni, and their six-year-old son. In the fall of 2007, Jende can hardly believe his luck when he lands a job as a chauffeur for Clark Edwards, a senior executive at Lehman Brothers. Clark demands punctuality, discretion, and loyalty--and Jende is eager to please. Clarks wife, Cindy, even offers Neni temporary work at the Edwardses summer home in the Hamptons. With these opportunities, Jende and Neni can at last gain a foothold in America and imagine a brighter future. However, the world of great power and privilege conceals troubling secrets, and soon Jende and Neni notice cracks in their employers façades. When the financial world is rocked by the collapse of Lehman Brothers, the Jongas are desperate to keep Jendes job--even as their marriage threatens to fall apart. As all four lives are dramatically upended, Jende and Neni are forced to make an impossible choice. Praise for Behold the Dreamers A debut novel by a young woman from Cameroon that illuminates the immigrant experience in America with the tenderhearted wisdom so lacking in our political discourse . . . Mbue is a bright and captivating storyteller. -- The Washington Post A capacious, big-hearted novel. -- The New York Times Book Review Behold the Dreamers heart . . . belongs to the struggles and small triumphs of the Jongas, which Mbue traces in clean, quick-moving paragraphs. -- Entertainment Weekly Mbues writing is warm and captivating. -- People (book of the week) [Mbues] book isnt the first work of fiction to grapple with the global financial crisis of 20072008, but its surely one of the best. . . . Its a novel that depicts a country both blessed and doomed, on top of the world, but always at risk of losing its balance. It is, in other words, quintessentially American. --NPR This story is one that needs to be told. -- Bust Behold the Dreamers challenges us all to consider what it takes to make us genuinely content, and how long is too long to live with our dreams deferred. -- O: The Oprah Magazine [A] beautiful, empathetic novel. -- The Boston Globe A witty, compassionate, swiftly paced novel that takes on race, immigration, family and the dangers of capitalist excess. -- St. Louis Post-Dispatch Mbue [is] a deft, often lyrical observer. . . . [Her] meticulous storytelling announces a writer in command of her gifts. --Minneapolis Star Tribune

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