Tundra Digital

  • Anglais The Dragon Turn

    Shane Peacock

    Summer 1869, and Sherlock Holmes and his friend Irene celebrate her sixteenth birthday by attending the theater to watch a celebrated magician make a real dragon appear on stage. It is the London sensation. Sherlock and Irene meet the magician, Alistair Hemsworth – just as he is arrested for the murder of his rival, The Wizard of Nottingham.
    It seems that traces of the missing Wizard’s blood and his spectacles were found in Hemsworth’s secret studio. Hemsworth has a motive: not only is the Wizard his rival, but he also caused a scandal when he lured Hemsworth’s wife away. But is Hemsworth guilty? Sherlock has his doubts, and soon, so does the reader.
    With humor and plot turns as dizzying as a narrow London lane, Shane Peacock invites his readers into a fascinating world, and a fresh adventure with one of literature’s favorite characters. The Boy Sherlock Holmes series is an international success with readers and reviewers alike.
    From the Hardcover edition.

  • Just 50,000 years ago, our hunter-gatherer ancestors ventured off the African savannah and into the wider world. Now, our technology reaches far out into the cosmos. How did we get to where we are today?
    With lively text and colorful illustrations, From Then to Now explains how individual societies struggled to find their own paths, despite war, disease, slavery, natural disasters, and the relentless growth of human knowledge. From Hammurabi to Henry Ford, from Incan couriers to the Internet, from the Taj Mahal to the Eiffel Tower, from Marco Polo to Martin Luther King, from Cleopatra to Catherine the Great, from boiled haggis to fried tarantulas – this is no less than the story of humanity. It’s the story of how we grew apart over all those years of migration and division, and how – as we recognize our common heritage and our often mixed ancestry – we can come together.
    An index, maps, and notes make this a must-have reference, as well as a delight to read and to discuss. From Then to Now is bound to create a generation of history buffs!
    From the Hardcover edition.

  • Anglais Rude Stories

    Jan Andrews

    Meet Mr. Mosquito, drawn from a Gypsy story. He's cantankerous and nasty enough to raise belly laughs along with the eyebrows of the polite. In a story inspired by Australian bush tales, we meet Ella and Bella, two hilarious (and flatulent) sisters. Angelina's earthy wit is memorialized in a story from Swahili tradition.
    The eight stories in Rude Stories have roots from Japan to Canada, from Africa to Eastern Europe, but they all share a sense of irreverence, and, because they are the work of a true storyteller, they beg to be read aloud, told aloud and shared. Francis Blake's hilarious askew art brings the characters to life in this spicy stew of international stories to satisfy every child's appetite for the deliciously absurd.
    From the Hardcover edition.

  • Anglais Hudson

    Janice Weaver

    History has not been kind to Henry Hudson. He's been dismissed as a short-tempered man who played favorites with his crew and had an unstoppable ambition and tenacity. Although he gave his name to a mighty river, an important strait, and a huge bay, today he is remembered more for the mutiny that took his life. The grandson of a trader, Hudson sailed under both British and Dutch flags, looking for a northern route to China. Although none of his voyages led to the discovery of a northwest passage, he did explore what is now Hudson's Bay and what is now New York City.
    Whatever his personal shortcomings, to sail through dangerous, ice-filled waters with only a small crew in a rickety old boat, he must have been someone of rare courage and vision. In Hudson, Janice Weaver has created a compelling portrait of a man who should be remembered not for his tragic end, but for the way he advanced our understanding of the world.
    From the Hardcover edition.

  • Anglais A Tinfoil Sky

    Cyndi Sand-Eveland

    Mel and her mother, Cecily, know what it’s like to live rough, whether it’s on the streets or in the apartment of an abusive man.When Cecily announces that they’ve had enough and that they are going to go home to her mother’s, Mel dreams of security, a comfortable bed, and a grandmother’s love seem to be about to come true. But some mistakes cannot be easily forgiven or erased. Her grandmother is not what Mel expects, and though the local library offers sanctuary, a real home seems beyond her grasp. Mel’s determination to rise above what fate has dealt is about to change that.
    Cyndi Sand-Eveland’s work with homeless youth gives her characters an authenticity no reader will forget. Ultimately, a story of hope and acceptance, A Tinfoil Sky is a powerful, can’t-putit- down novel.

  • Anglais Remember Me

    Irene N Watts

    Young Marianne is one of the lucky ones. She has escaped on one of the first kindertransporte organized to take Jewish children out of Germany to safety in Britain.
    At first Marianne is desperate. She does not speak English, she is not welcome in her sponsors' home, and, most of all, she misses her mother terribly. As the months pass, she realizes that she cannot control the circumstances around her. She must rely on herself if she is to survive.
    In this exciting companion to Good-bye Marianne, Irene N. Watts has created a memorable character, and a story that is ultimately about hope, not war. Based on true events, this fictional account of hatred and racism speaks volumes about history and human nature.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • During World War II, a German agent landed in Canada from a U-boat. Curtis Parkinson has used this true historical event to tell a fast-paced, exciting story. Sixteen-year-old Scott and his friend Adam find summer jobs as deckhands on the Rapids Prince, a ship that plies the waters between the town of Prescott, on the St. Lawrence River, and Montreal. Scott overhears convincing information that a German agent is actually on board the boat. He has a good reason for not telling anybody, but his silence eventually leads him into more trouble than he can imagine, including a possible murder and a kidnapping. It is up to the boys to expose the agent in order to save the Rapids Prince and the innocent passengers on board. Curtis Parkinson has written an impossible-to-put-down novel that combines history with high adventure.

  • Anglais Clay Man

    It is 1595, and the rabbi's son Jacob is frustrated with having to live in the walled ghetto known as Jewish Town. Why can't he venture outside of the gates and explore the beautiful city? His father warns him that Passover is a dangerous time to be a Jew and that the people from outside accuse the Jews of dreadful deeds. But one night, Jacob follows his father and two companions as they unlock the ghetto gates and proceed to the river, where they mold a human shape from the mud of the riverbank. When the rabbi speaks strange words, the shape is infused with life and the Golem of Prague is born.
    In this breathtaking retelling of a timeless tale, Irene N. Watts's beautiful words are complemented by the haunting black-and-white images of artist Kathryn E. Shoemaker.
    From the Hardcover edition.

  • Anglais No Moon

    Irene N Watts

    A story of reliance and resilience.Did you call out to us, Johnny, before your small body was dragged down under the water? Why didn't we hear you? I am sorry! I'll never forget.
    Louisa Gardener is the fourteen-year-old nursemaid to the young daughters of a wealthy, titled family living in London, England, in 1912.
    Despite the bullying Nanny Mackintosh, for whom she is an extra pair of hands, she loves her work and her young charges. Then everything changes. The family decides to sail to New York aboard the Titanic. An accident to the children's nanny, only days prior to the sailing, means that Louisa must go in her stead. She cannot refuse, although she dreads even the mention of the ocean. Memories she has suppressed, except in nightmares, come crowding back.
    When Louisa was five and her sister seven years old, their two-year-old brother died on an outing to the seaside. Since that time, Louisa has had a fear of the ocean. She blames herself for the accident, though she has been told it wasn't her fault.
    If Louisa refuses to go on the voyage, she will be dismissed, and she will never get beyond the working-class life she has escaped from.
    How Louisa learns self-reliance, overcomes her fears, and goes beyond what is expected of a girl makes No Moon an unforgettable story.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • Anglais Grease Town

    Ann Towell

    A heartbreaking history of prejudice, family ties, and the loss of innocence.When twelve-year-old Titus Sullivan decides to run away to join his Uncle Amos and older brother, Lem, he finds an alien and exciting world in Oil Springs, the first Canadian oil boomtown of the 19th century.
    The Enniskillen swamp is slick with oil, and it takes enterprising folk to plumb its depths. The adventurers who work there are a tough lot of individuals. In this hard world, Titus becomes friends with a young black boy, the child of slaves who came to Canada on the Underground Railroad. When tragedy strikes in the form of a race riot, Titus's loyalties are tested as he struggles to deal with the terrible fallout.
    Though the characters are fictitious, the novel is based on a race riot that occurred in Oil Springs, Ontario, on March 20, 1863. Grease Town is historical fiction at its finest.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • In all their permutations, these unforgettable stories explore one of the irresistible facets of human nature, the fact that everyone has a secret. Marthe Jocelyn has selected twelve stories
    by several of the best authors in North America to explore the nature and the power of secrets. Sometimes secrets can be downright funny - how would you like to be the front person for your fake, clairvoyant mother? Secrets can also be scary - if you are pretending that your father is dead so you don't have to introduce him to your teacher. And sometimes secrets can break your heart, and heal it - when they have to do with the ties that bind generations together.
    Contributors include Susan Adach, Anne Carter, Gillian Chan, Nancy Hartry, Marthe Jocelyn, Julie Johnston, Dayal Kaur Khalsa, Loris Lesynski, Anne Gray Sarndal, Martha Slaughter, Teresa Toten, and Elizabeth Winthrop.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • In the late nineteenth century, in a dot of a town called Westley, lives the smallest girl in the world. Josephine stands only twenty-two inches high and her parents charge gawkers a penny a piece to see her - until they realize that the headmistress of MacLaren Academy for Girls will pay even more.
    At the Academy Josephine is treated like a slave and is tormented by the fine young ladies who attend, until she takes five gold dollars and runs away. She finds a new life with R. J. Walters' Museum of Earthly Astonishments. Among the other human curiosities in the Coney Island freak show, Josephine finds the family she has never known...and dangers greater than any she'd ever dreamed.
    This riveting novel of adventure and injustice, new in paperback, has received many honors, including selection as a finalist for the Canadian Library book of the Year for Children Award, and as a shortlisted title for the Hackmatack Children's Choice Book Award and the Red Cedar Book Award.
    From the Hardcover edition.

  • Anglais Double Spell

    Janet Lunn

    "Ever since we've had this doll," Elizabeth said hesitantly, "we've had funny things happen - the same dreams and knowing things and stuff like that."
    Twins Jane and Elizabeth are twelve years old and have outgrown dolls. Nevertheless, on a cold wet spring Saturday they find themselves in an antique store, inexplicably drawn to a small, tattered old fashioned doll. Even the owner of the store seems to understand that the doll somehow belongs to the girls.
    Once the twins buy the doll, stranger and stranger things begin to happen, and a young girl from the past seems to be calling out to them. The search to discover the history of the little doll brings the twins terrifyingly close to the world of the supernatural as they finally solve a tantalizing mystery.
    Janet Lunn's first novel, long unavailable, is republished in a fresh, beautiful edition.

  • It is 1947 and Yankee fever grips the Bronx. Nine-year-old Joey Sexton joins the neighborhood kids who flock to the park to team up and play. However, Joey is of mixed race and his skin is lighter than the other kids'. He is seldom picked.
    When Joey's mother dies, he is sent to live with his mother's estranged family. Joey is whisked away to Brooklyn. Though it's just across town, it might as well be a different world. His grandfather, his aunt Frieda, and his ten-year-old cousin Roberta are not only white, they are Jewish. Joey knows nothing about Brooklyn or Judaism. The only thing that's constant is the baseball madness that grips the community. Only this time, the heroes aren't Joey's beloved Yankees. They are the Brooklyn Dodgers, especially Jackie Robinson, a man whose struggle to integrate baseball helped set the stage for black America's struggle for acceptance and civil rights.
    Joey's story takes readers to a time when America's favorite pastime became a battleground for human rights.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • How do you shut up when your nose is doing all the talking?
    Alan is not big or strong. He hates playing soccer and can barely keep up in math class. Moreover he's fodder for every bully for miles around. But all that changes the day Norbert, an alien from Jupiter, comes to earth on an exploration mission and moves into - Alan's nose. Soon Alan isn't acting like himself, but is Norbert really to blame? Loud, pushy and hilarious, Norbert teaches Alan to stand up for himself, even when the odds are stacked against him.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • In this hilarious sequel to The Nose from Jupiter, Alan is to take his first airplane ride. He is off to New York, where his father will meet him for some "quality time" together. There are one or two snags, though. First, his father isn't at the airport. Then there's his cranky seatmate, Frieda, who is almost kidnapped while she's waiting for her wheelchair at the baggage claim. Sally, an abandoned mutt, joins the scene. And finally, Norbert is back. He is an alien from Jupiter who had previously taken up residence in Alan's nose when he was on a fact-finding mission to Earth. Alan had been, to say the least, an unwilling host to Norbert, but when you're lost in New York City being chased by bad guys, you need all the help you can get!
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • Nominated in the fiction category for the 2004/2005 Red Cedar Book Awards (British Columbia's Young Reader's Choice book award)
    Norbert's back, and Alan's got him! In the third of Richard Scrimger's wildly popular Nose books, Alan is off on a camping trip with his good friend, Victor. Fun, right? Not if the person who is taking you camping happens to be Christopher, your mother's new boyfriend. And not if you aren't exactly a fan of the great outdoors, with its bugs and swamps and bears.
    The woods are full of dangers, and the boys seem to encounter them all in one hilarious misadventure after another. It's up to Norbert, the alien from Jupiter, to help Alan find his way out of the forest.
    From the Hardcover edition.

  • Norbert, the tiny wisecracking alien from Jupiter, gets an emergency phone call from home. His sweetheart, Nerissa, has been kidnapped by an evil giant and placed in the Lost Tower of Lotubmen. He must find and rescue her, but he can't do it alone. Norbert has helped Alan through three earthly adventures. Now the tables are turned, and Norbert needs Alan's help. So Alan, the boy from Earth, comes to Jupiter and finds himself in a strange - and yet in some ways strangely familiar - environment.
    Richard Scrimger's The Nose from Jupiter, A Nose for Adventure, and Noses are Red have won avid fans from Illinois to Italy. Alan is truly an everyboy. He is terrible at sports, is living through his parents' divorce, and has to contend with bullies and even villains. But he has a secret weapon. Norbert, an alien from Jupiter, has come to Earth and established a home-from-home inside Alan's nose. It's from there that the wise-cracking, brave, and irresistible Norbert changes Alan's life.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • Readers first met the Peeler family as they went on a hilarious summer road trip in The Way to Schenectady. Now winter has come and with it the school holiday pageant. Jane Peeler, who loves to be the boss at all times, is directing her class production of The Nutcracker. All does not go as well as she planned as she finds the plot of the presentation creeping into her own life. First, there are problems at school, caused by a gym teacher who wants the gym for basketball, not for rehearsal space. Then there's a budding romance in the cast. At home, Dad has come down with an illness, and Grandma -- grumpy, chain-smoking, profane Grandma -- comes back on the scene as a reluctant baby-sitter to Jane and her younger brothers Bill and Bernie.
    The fun that ensues is pure Scrimger, and is sure to delight his legion of fans.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • Winner of the Society of School Librarians International's Best Book Award - Language Arts, Grades 7-12 Novels
    Winner of the 2005 White Pine Awards, Fiction category
    Selected for inclusion in the Best Books for the Teen Age 2004 List by the New York Public Library
    Nominated for Snow Willow Award (The Saskatchewan Young Reader's Choice Awards)
    Nominated for the Canadian Library Association's 2004 Young Adult Canadian Book Award
    More than You Can Chew has been called a One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest for young adults.
    Marty Black has retreated from a difficult family situation into the area she can best control, her own appetites. She may not be able to control her parents' behavior, but she can decide what she will and will not eat. Eventually, she stops eating altogether. Marty is close to death when she finally asks for help and finds herself in a psychiatric institution. But recognizing her need for help is only the first tenuous step on a long road to recovery.
    Marty's ability to find a way to live, despite the powerful lure of anorexia, is the core of this fine, insightful novel.
    Marnelle Tokio's semi autobiographical story will resonate with every teenager who faces issues of family, body image, and self-confidence.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • Anglais Room 207

    Marnelle Tokio

    The kids of Room 207 arrive at their class on the first day of school to find it has suffered "a most grievous accident" and is covered in mysterious slime. Their teacher leads her charges to the original one-room schoolhouse that stands on the property. But the schoolroom isn't empty -- it is inhabited by a spooky guest. The shock of being transferred to the worst classroom on the planet has barely worn off when Erik, the school's biggest bully, and Stove, the world's second fastest pot-bellied pig, are added to the attendance sheet.
    The winner of this year's Best Classroom contest will represent the school on a reality show, but what chance does Room 207 have to win when it is already nicknamed, "The Pigpen"? And how do you accept an award if your teacher has been swallowed by slime?
    Room 207's cast of hilarious characters includes a guinea pig named Butterbum, a cat who needed ten lives and nine kids desperate to prove themselves to the school and to the reality-tv viewing world.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • Anglais Flower

    Irene N Watts

    Thirteen-year-old Katie is an unwilling summer guest in the Victorian home of her Halifax grandparents. All she wants to do is stay in her attic bedroom and brood. Disgruntled over her new stepmother's pregnancy and how a baby might affect her life, Katie takes refuge in her dreams of playing the part of the disagreeable orphan Mary Lennox in the upcoming school production of The Secret Garden.
    When Katie sees a shadow on her bedroom wall of an old-fashioned girl holding a flower, she tries to convince herself it is caused by moonlight. But the girl reappears and shares her life with Katie, reaching across the years to her. Is she a ghost? As Katie searches for some tangible evidence of the girl's presence, she discovers a package of letters from World War I containing clues to a bygone time when British orphans were sent to Canada as Home Children.
    In this haunting journey of a young girl looking for answers and an orphan girl from the past who tries to provide them, award-winning novelist Irene N. Watts uncovers a tale about the real meaning of family.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • Selected by the Pennsylvania School Librarians Association as one of the PSLA YA Top Forty Fiction Titles 2003
    Nominated in the fiction category for the 2004/2005 Red Cedar Book Awards (British Columbia's Young Reader's Choice book award)
    Sophie Mandel was only seven years old when she arrived in London on the first Kindertransport from Germany. She has grown up with a friend of her parents, a woman she calls Aunt Em, and despite the war and its deprivations, she has made a good life for herself in England with her foster mother. She has even stopped thinking about the parents she left behind. Now the war is over, and fourteen-year-old Sophie is faced with a terrible dilemma. Where does she belong?
    In this, the third book about the characters introduced in Good-bye Marianne and Remember Me, Irene N. Watts explores the themes of friendship, family, and the nature of love. Finding Sophie is sure to become a favorite.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • Anglais After

    Francis Chalifour

    Nominated for the Governor General's Literary Awards 2005, (Children's Literature, Text)
    Fifteen-year-old Francis's father has committed suicide and nothing will be the same again. Suicide is ugly, unglamorous, and it is never a solution. Its aftermath is dreadful.
    At first, Francis feels a terrible guilt. Could he have been a better son? What if he hadn't left his home in Montreal to go on a brief holiday in New York the weekend it happened? Soon the guilt turns to anger and then to a sadness so profound that he thinks he can't bear it.
    After is the map of a year following the suicide of a family member. In the course of months, with the love of his mother, with counseling, and with the balm of time, Francis takes his first steps toward coming to terms with his father's - and his family's - tragedy. After is intensely personal, but it will resonate with anyone who has faced the loss of a loved one.
    This brilliant autobiographical first novel is an acute analysis of the grieving process. Although it is steeped in Francis's sadness, it is ultimately a story of hope.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

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