Pushkin Press Digital

  • A searing and timeless evocation of the nature of humanity,The acclaimed aviator and adventurer wrote Letter to a Hostage while waiting in neutral Portugal for a passage to the United States, having just escaped from the terrors of war-torn France. Saint-Exupéry's observations on the aimless existence of his fellow exiles in a Lisbon filled with parties, gambling and spies leads him to examine the nature of existence itself. The particularity of this moment, as the world seemed to be coming to an end, makes for a searing and timeless evocation of the nature of humanity.
    A book I always keep in my pocket ... As perfectly formed as 'Heart of Darkness'. -- Paul Blezard-Gymer, BBC Radio 4's A Good Read
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  • Stefan Zweig's memoir The World of Yesterday, (Die Welt von Gestern) is a unique love letter to the lost world of pre-war Europe The famous autobiography is published by Pushkin Press, with a cover designed by David Pearson and Clare Skeats. Translated by the award-winning Anthea Bell.Stefan Zweig's memoir, The World of Yesterday recalls the golden age of pre- war Europe its seeming permanence, its promise and its devastating fall. Through the story of his life, and his relationships with the leading literary figures of the day, Zweig s passionate, evocative prose paints a stunning portrait of an era that danced brilliantly on the brink of extinction.This new translation by the award- winning Anthea Bell captures the spirit of Zweig’s writing in arguably his most important work, completed shortly before his death in a suicide pact with his wife in 1942. The World of Yesterday is one of the greatest memoirs of the twentieth century, as perfect in its evocation of the world Zweig loved, as it is in its portrayal of how that world was destroyed.'?-- David Hare'This absolutely extraordinary book is more than just an autobiography. (...) This is a book that should be read by anyone who is even slightly interested in the creative imagination and the intellectual life, the brute force of history upon individual lives, the possibility of culture and, quite simply, what it meant to be alive between 1881 and 1942. That should cover a fair number of you.'?-- Nicholas Lezard, GuardianTranslated from the German by Anthea Bell, Stefan Zweig's The World of Yesterday, is published by Pushkin Press.Stefan Zweig (1881-1942) was born in Vienna, into a wealthy Austrian-Jewish family. He studied in Berlin and Vienna and was first known as a poet and translator, then as a biographer. Zweig travelled widely, living in Salzburg between the wars, and was an international bestseller with a string of hugely popular novellas including Letter from an Unknown Woman, Amok and Fear.In 1934, with the rise of Nazism, he moved to London, where he wrote his only novel Beware of Pity. He later moved on to Bath, taking British citizenship after the outbreak of the Second World War. With the fall of France in 1940 Zweig left Britain for New York, before settling in Brazil, where in 1942 he and his wife were found dead in an apparent double suicide.Much of his work is available from Pushkin Press.

  • In 1913 a young second lieutenant discovers the terrible danger of pity. He had no idea the girl was lame when he asked her to dance -- his compensatory afternoon calls relieve his guilt but give her a dangerous glimmer of hope.Stefan Zweig's only novel is a devastating depiction of the torment of the betrayalof both honour and love, realised against the background of the disintegration of the Austro-Hungarian Empire.

  • Anglais An Open Secret

    Gamerro Carlos

    DarO£Â­o Ezcurra is one of the thousands of Argentinians unlucky enough to be 'disappeared' by the military government"€“murdered by the local chief of police with the complicity of his friends and neighbours. Twenty years later, Fefe returns to the town where DarO£Â­o met his fate and attempts to discover how the community let such a crime happen. Lies, excuses and evasion ensue"€“desperate attempts to deny the guilty secret of which the whole community, even Fefe himself, is afraid.

  • A novel of philosophy and love, politics and waltzes, history and the here-and-now, Andrés Neuman's Traveller of the Century is a journey into the soul of Europe, penned by one of the most exciting South-American writers of our time.A traveller stops off for the night in the mysterious city of Wandernburg. He intends to leave the following day, but the city begins to ensnare him with its strange, shifting geography. When Hans befriends an old organ grinder, and falls in love with Sophie, the daughter of a local merchant, he finds it impossible to leave. Through a series of memorable encounters with starkly different characters, Neuman takes the reader on a hypothetical journey back into post-Napoleonic Europe, subtly evoking its parallels with our modern era. At the heart of the novel lies the love story between Sophie and Hans. They are both translators, and between dictionaries and bed, bed and dictionaries,they gradually build up their own fragile common language. Through their relationship Neuman explores the idea that all love is an act of translation, and that all translation is an act of love.'A beautiful, accomplished novel: as ambitious as it is generous, as moving as it is smart' Juan Gabriel Vàsquez, GuardianAndrés Neuman (b.1977) was born in Buenos Aires and later moved to Granada, Spain. Selected as one of Granta magazine's Best Young Spanish-Language Novelists, Neuman was included in the Hay Festival's Bogotà 39 list. He has published numerous novels, short stories, essays and poetry collections. He received the Hiperion Prize for Poetry for El tobogàn, and Traveller of the Century won the Alfaguara Prize and the National Critics Prize in 2009.

  • Tenderly, observantly, incisively, Edith Pearlman captures life on the page like few other writers. She is a master of the short story, and this is a spectacular collection.

  • Close to the Machine: Technophilia and Its Discontents, Ellen Ullman's cult classic memoir of the world of computers in the 1980s and early 1990s, is an insight of a world we rarely see up close."Astonishing... impossible to put down"San Francisco Chronicle"We see the seduction at the heart of programming: embedded in the hijinks and hieroglyphics are the esoteric mysteries of the human mind"WiredClose to the Machinehas become a cult classic: Ellen Ullman's humane, insightful, and beautifully written memoir explores the ever-complicating intersections between people and technology; the strange ecstasies of programming; the messiness of life and the artful efficiency of code. It is a deeply personal, prescient account of working at the forefront of computing.With a new introduction by Jaron Lanier, author ofYou Are Not a Gadget"By turns hilarious and sobering, this slim gem of a book chronicles the Silicon Valley way of life... full of delicately profound insights into work, money, love, and the search for a life that matters"NewsweekEllen Ullman'sClose to the Machine, a memoir of her time as a software engineer during the early years of the internet revolution, became a cult classic and established her as a writer of considerable talent; with her second book,The Bug, she became an acclaimed and vital novelist;By Bloodis her third. All three titles are published in the UK by Pushkin Press. Her essays and opinion pieces have been widely published in venues such asHarper's,The New York Times,Salon, andWired. She lives in San Francisco.

  • Anglais Jarmila

    Weiss Ernst

    Prêt à partir à la découverture du corps humain ? Grâce à une ingénieuse superposition des couleurs, Humanissime offre au lecteur une imagerie époustouflante et changeante de notre corps et de ses principaux systèmes à travers la vision des muscles, du squelette et des organes. Au lecteur d'observer et d'explorer ce panorama, dans un jeu onirique et graphique unique.

    Humanissime présente les 10 principaux systèmes du corps humain :
    - le corps humain dans son ensemble ;
    - la tête ;
    - les yeux et les oreilles ;
    - la bouche et le nez ;
    - le coeur ;
    - les côtes et les poumons ;
    - l'abdomen ;
    - la grossesse ;
    - les bras et les mains ;
    - les jambes et les pieds.

    Chaque chapitre est composé de 3 doubles. La première présente les informations clés. La deuxième nous emmène dans la salle de radiologie pour observer tour à tour le squelette, les muscles et les organes grâce aux trois filtres de couleur (vert, rouge et bleu). La troisième double, la salle d'anatomie, propose le détail de ce qui a été vu précédemment, sous forme de planches et de fiches.

  • Three boys, three diverging destinies-but what, or who, is pulling the strings? It was a memorable summer: with the broken-down old road that suddenly turned into a strip of gleaming asphalt, and the abandoned motorbike the three boys found as a rusty heap and built into a racer. But it was also more than that, more than a distraction from the boredom of their small Tuscan town, than a few weeks of racing and dodging the attentions of the local Marshal.For Jacopo and his two friends, it began their journeys out into the world, separated by thousands of miles, steered by something other than fate-helped on their way, and controlled...Tautly written and deeply moving, Enchantment is more than a simple coming-of-age story, it is a powerful, original novel from an important, compelling new author.Pietro Grossi, writer and translator, was born in 1978 in Florence and currently lives and works in Tuscany. His collection of short stories, Fists, and his novel The Breakare also published by Pushkin Press."A fine writer" Tobias Jones, The Sunday TimesPraise for The Break: "Small and perfectly formed ... reaching its end leaves the reader desirous to start all over again" Amanda Hopkinson, IndependentPraise for Fists. "There is more power and pathos in this short piece of spare, timeless prose than in most densely-written novels" Daniel Hahn, Independent

  • From the Fatherland, with Love is set in an alternative, dystopian present in which the dollar has collapsed and Japan's economy has fallen along with it. The North Korean government, sensing an opportunity, sends a fleet of 'rebels' in the first land invasion that Japan has ever faced. Japan can't cope with the surprise onslaught of 'Operation From the Fatherland, with Love'. But the terrorist Ishihara and his band of renegade youths - once dedicated to upsetting the Japanese government - turn their deadly attention to the North Korean threat. They will not allow Fukuoka to fall without a fight. Epic in scale, From the Fatherland, with Love is laced throughout with Murakami's characteristically savage violence. It's both a satisfying thriller and a completely mad, over-the-top novel like few others.

  • Anglais The Bug

    Ullman Ellen

    The debut novel by the acclaimed American novelist and former computer programmer Ellen Ullman,The Bugis both a novel of ideas and a suspense story.'Thrilling and intellectually fearless . . . If more contemporary novels delivered news this relevant and wise they'd have to stop declaring the death of the novel'The New York TimesIn one of the computer-dictated pauses that now constantly intrude on our lives, Roberta Walton starts to think back twenty years, to her first job in computing, to the bug she found there and the man it destroyed. Ellen Ullman's acclaimed first novel compellingly, thrillingly explores the connections between us and our machines, and between programming, obsession and madness. As the bug - bug UI-01017, The Jester - teases, defies and threatens its creators.Ellen Ullman'sThe Bugis published by Pushkin Press.
    Ellen Ullman'sClose to the Machine, a memoir of her time as a software engineer during the early years of the internet revolution, became a cult classic and established her as a writer of considerable talent; with her second book,The Bug, she became an acclaimed and vital novelist;By Bloodis her third. All three are published in the UK by Pushkin Press. Her essays and opinion pieces have been widely published in venues such asHarper's,The New York Times,Salon, andWired. She lives in San Francisco.

  • A hilarious and moving road trip around Iceland in an old car, told by a recently divorced woman with a five year-old boy 'on loan'After a day of being dumped - twice - and accidentally killing a goose, the narrator begins to dream of tropical holidays far away from the chaos of her current life. instead, she finds her plans wrecked by her best friend's deaf-mute son, thrust into her reluctant care. But when a shared lottery ticket nets the two of them over 40 million kroner, she and the boy head off on a road trip across iceland, taking in cucumber-farming hotels, dead sheep, and any number of her exes desperate for another chance. Blackly comic and uniquely moving, Butterflies in November is an extraordinary, hilarious tale of motherhood, relationships and the legacy of life's mistakes.Auður Ava Olafsdóttir was born in Iceland in 1958, studied art history in Paris and has lectured in History of Art at the University of Iceland. Her earlier novel, The Greenhouse (2007), won the DV Culture Award for literature and was nominated for the Nordic Council Literature Award. She currently lives and works in Reykjavik."Quirky and poetic, everything is there... An extraordinary novelist" Madame Figaro"A poetic and sensory narrative" El País

  • Ten turning points in history, vividly sketched by the great Stefan Zweig ;Such dramatically concentrated, such fateful hours, in which a timeless decision hangs on a single date, a single hour, even just a single minute, rarely occur in everyday life, and only rarely in the course of history. One of the twentieth century's great humanists and a hugely popular fiction writer, Stefan Zweig's historical works bring the past to life in brilliant Technicolor. This collection contains ten typically breathless and erudite dramatizations of some of the most pivotal episodes in human history. From General Grouchy's failure to intervene at Waterloo, to the miraculous resurrection of George Frideric Handel, this, Stefan Zweig's selection of historical turning points, newly translated by Anthea Bell, is idiosyncratic, fascinating and as always hugely readable.

  • A young messenger. A secret mission. A kingdom in peril.
    It is the dead of night.
    Sixteen-year-old Tiuri must spend hours locked in a chapel in silent contemplation if he is to be knighted the next day.
    But, as he waits by the light of a flickering candle, he hears a knock at the door and a voice desperately asking for help.
    A secret letter must be delivered to King Unauwen across the GreatMountains - a letter upon which the fate of the entire kingdom depends. Tiuri has a vital role to play, one that might cost him his knighthood.
    Tiuri's journey will take him through dark, menacing forests, across treacherous rivers, to sinister castles and strange cities. He will encounter evil enemies who would kill to get the letter, but also the best of friends in the most unexpected places.
    He must trust no one.
    He must keep his true identity secret.
    Above all, he must never reveal what is in the letter...
    The Letter for the Kingis the thrilling story of one boy's battle against evil, set in an enchanted world of chivalry, courage and true friendship.
    Tonke Dragtwas born in Jakarta in 1930 and spent most of her childhood in Indonesia. When she was twelve, she was interned in a camp run by the Japanese occupiers, where she wrote (with a friend) her very first book using begged and borrowed paper. Her family moved to the Netherlands after the war and, after studying at the Royal Academy of Art in The Hague, Dragt became an art teacher. She published her first book in 1961, followed a year later byThe Letter for the King, which won the Children's Book of the Year award and has been translated into sixteen languages. Dragt was awarded the State Prize for Youth Literature in 1976 and was knighted in 2001.
    'The story has the quality of a legend, a tale of ancient times. Over a million copies of the book have been sold worldwide.The Letter for the Kinghas everything.'Nederlands Dagblad
    'It is fascinating, captivating in the same way as Tolkien's The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. As well as the familiar battle between good and evil, we are presented with a discovery of true chivalry.'Schager Courant

  • A searing and timeless evocation of the nature of humanity , The acclaimed aviator and adventurer wrote Letter to a Hostage while waiting in neutral Portugal for a passage to the United States, having just escaped from the terrors of war-torn France. Saint-Exupéry's observations on the aimless existence of his fellow exiles in a Lisbon filled with parties, gambling and spies leads him to examine the nature of existence itself. The particularity of this moment, as the world seemed to be coming to an end, makes for a searing and timeless evocation of the nature of humanity. A book I always keep in my pocket ... As perfectly formed as 'Heart of Darkness'. -- Paul Blezard-Gymer, BBC Radio 4's A Good Read

  • An elegant fable for the modern age, Louise de Vilmorin's novella Madame de is a poignant tale of honour, deception and fate. This is the story of Madame de's earrings. It is a story of jewellery, of love, of denial, of pain, of delight, of society, that has the simplicity of a fairy tale, the elegance of an eighteenth century roman-a-clef and the particular echoing loneliness that is a phenomenon of the twentieth century: the circle of deceit that society allows proves fatal to the honesty of intense passion. This novella became The Earrings of Madame de, a 1952 film directed by Max Ophuls. Translated from the French by Duff Cooper, Louise de Vilmorin's Madame de is published by Pushkin Press '.. the most cherishable is the least familiar - Madame de by Louise de Vilmorin. De Vilmorin was a noted beauty whose lovers included Antoine de Exupery and Orson Welles; her glittering fable of passion and deception centres on a pair of diamond earrings. To make it even more of a gem, Madame de has an afterword by John Julius Norwich, whose father Duff Cooper was its translator. Cooper was one of Vilmorin's lovers while serving as British Ambassador to Paris... So this tiny volume (price £5) offers not just a story, but the story behind the story).'-- Guardian

  • A New Heroine. An Old Evil. An Unforgettable Adventure. A thrilling new supernatural adventure series. Fuses the excitement, action and extraordinary worlds of Harry Potter, I Am Number Four and Buffy the Vampire Slayer with an inspirational new teen heroine. Oksa Pollock is a normal thirteen-year-old girl, starting a new life in London. New lives, new friends, a new school and new adventures. But bizarre things start happening around Oksa she finds she can produce fire from her hands, move objects with her mind, and even fly. Finally the truth emerges...her family fled Edefia, their magical, hidden homeland years ago. And more than that: Oksa is their queen... Oksa will be thrown into a wilder adventure than she could ever have imagined. She must triumph over her enemies. The whole of Edefia is counting on her.

  • Jamie Mason spins the gripping story of lonely widower and accidental murderer Jason Getty, who lives with the guilt of having buried his victim in his backyard, only to discover two other bodies, a man and a woman, when his garden is dug up by a landscaping firm. The persistent detectives investigating the two murders are at first unaware of the third, but old blood stains soon reveal its existence. Jason is thrown into a macabre plot of trying to cover up his deed while forging a soul-redeeming friendship with Leah, the dead man's fearless widow.Mason is a master of tight plot-weaving and deep empathy for all of her characters, no matter how flawed. The causes and consequences of their crimes are brilliantly illuminated. Readers will fall in love with the book's most loveable character, a heroic dog who is the best detective and truth-seeker of them all.Jamie Mason is the managing editor of the popular authorscoop.com and lives with her family in North Carolina. Three Graves Full is her first novel.

  • In investigating ancient Greek concepts concerning the relationship between seeing and knowing, Roberto Peregalli presents an eloquent demonstration of the modernity of Ancient Greek wisdom. The Embroidered Armour examines the Greek Mysteries, mythology and legends that heralded a revolution in thinking between the times of Homer and Plato, which gave birth to the Western cultural tradition.

  • A highly contagious book virus, a literary society and a Snow Queen-like disappearing author 'She came to realise that under one reality there's always another. And another one under that.' Only very special people are chosen by children's author Laura White to join 'The Society', an elite group of writers in the small town of Rabbit Back. Now a tenth member has been selected: Ella, literature teacher and possessor of beautifully curving lips. But soon Ella discovers that the Society is not what it seems. What is its mysterious ritual, 'The Game'? What explains the strange disappearance that occurs at Laura's winter party, in a whirlwind of snow? Why are the words inside books starting to rearrange themselves? Was there once another tenth member, before her? Slowly, disturbing secrets that had been buried come to light... In this chilling, darkly funny novel, the uncanny brushes up against the everyday in the most beguiling and unexpected of ways.

  • Anglais Venices

    Morand Paul

    A poetic evocation of the French diplomat's encounters and experiences, filtered through the one constant in his life"€”Venice.Diplomat, writer and poet, traveller and socialite, friend of Proust, Giraudoux and Malraux, Paul Morand was out of the most original writers of the twentieth century. He was French literature's globe-trotter, and his delightful autobiography is far from being yet another account of a writer's life. Instead it is a poetic evocation of certain scenes among Morand's rich and varied encounters and experience, filtered through the one constant in his life"€”the one place to which he would always return"€”Venice.Admired both by Ezra Pound and by Marcel Proust as a pioneer craftsman of Modernist French prose (...) The sheer shapeliness of his prose recalls Hemingway; the urbanity of his self-destructiveness compares with Fitzgerald's; and his camera eye is as lucidly stroboscopic as that of Dos Passos. He is, like Victor Segalen, Blaise Cendrars, Valery Larbaud, and Saint-John Perse, one of the great nomads of 20th-century French literature, racing through the apocalypse with the haste and glamor of an Orient Express. It is a pity we should have had to wait this long to catch up with him. --The New York TimesVenices is balanced by the sharpness of the imagery. He writes in a melancholy vein of the loves, jealousies and regrets he has experienced in Venice ... Exquisitely translated, Venices is a travel memoir of the highest order. -- IAN THOMSON, Sunday Times

  • An Irish Times Book of the Year 'It will stay with you for the rest of your life' - Nicholas Lezard, Guardian 'This is an original at work' - George Szirtes, The Times 'Quick-paced, taut prose ... rendered beautifully in Karetnyk's accomplished new translation' - Ivan Juritz, Independent on Sunday 'Elegantly eerie ... devastatingly atmospheric ... cool, wonderfully fraught' - Eileen Battersby, Irish Times 'A mesmerising work of literature' - Antony Beevor 'Truly troubling, a weird meditation on death, war, and sex... Bryan Karetnyk's new translation makes you believe in the power of the original' - Lorin Stein, Paris Review 'Coincidence, fate, guilt, redemption, love, death and melodrama are thrillingly interwoven with irresistible style and elegance' - Val Hennessy, Daily Mail 'Of all my memories, of all my life's innumerable sensations, the most onerous was that of the single murder I had committed.' A man comes across a short story which recounts in minute detail his killing of a soldier, long ago - from the victim's point of view. It's a story that should not exist, and whose author can only be a dead man. So begins the strange quest for the elusive writer 'Alexander Wolf'. A singular classic, The Spectre of Alexander Wolf is a psychological thriller and existential inquiry into guilt and redemption, coincidence and fate, love and death. Gaito Gazdanov (Georgi Ivanovich Gazdanov, 1903-1971), son of an Ossetian forester, was born in St Petersburg and brought up in Siberia and Ukraine, he joined Baron Wrangel's White Army in 1919 aged just sixteen, and fought in the Russian Civil War until the Army's evacuation from the Krimea in 1920. After a brief sojo

  • A taxi-driver in 1930s Vienna impersonates a murder victim-with unsettling consequences"One doesn't step into anyone's life, not even a dead man's, without having to live it to the end."A man climbs into Ferdinand Sponer's cab, gives the name of a hotel, and before he reaches it has been murdered: shot through the throat. And though Sponer has so far committed no crime, he is drawn into the late Jack Mortimer's life, and might not be able to escape its tangles and intrigues before it is too late...Twice filmed, I Was Jack Mortimer is a tale of misappropriated identity as darkly captivating and twisting as the books of Patricia Highsmith.Alexander Lernet-Holenia was born in Vienna in 1897. He served in the Austro-Hungarian army in the First World War and became a protégé of Rainer Maria Rilke. During his life he wrote poetry, novels, plays and was a successful screenwriter. His uneasy relationship with the National Socialist Party resulted in his removal from prominence in 1944, but after the end of the Second World War, he again became a vital figure in Austrian cultural life. He died in 1976.

  • A darkly hilarious tale of a model family's disintegration. Professor Siem Sigerius - maths genius, jazz lover, judo champion, Renaissance man. When Aaron meets his girlfriend Joni's family for the first time, her multitalented father could hardly be a more intimidating figure, but somehow the underachieving photographer manages to bluff his way to a friendship with the paterfamilias. With his feet under the table at the beautiful Sigerius farmhouse, Aaron feels part of the family. A perfect family. Until, that is, things start to go wrong in a very big way. A cataclysmic explosion in a firework factory, the advent of internet pornography, the reappearance of a forgotten murderer and a jet-black wig-all play a role in the spectacular fragmentation of the Sigerius clan... and of Aaron's fragile psyche. "Great European art: the Dutchman Peter Buwalda explodes the bourgeois family saga. The narrative pyrotechnics alone are a tour de force." Die Zeit "Peter Buwalda's impressive family saga is a genuine page-turner, with a forceful, precise style. The author races with unstoppable speed towards the finish, without getting entangled in the numerous gripping narrative strands, without even steering out of the curve." Libris-Prize Jury Report, 2011 "Buwalda's debut novel [is] daring in its linguistic power and freedom, and impressive, even frightening, in its psychological sharpness and precision ... great and outrageous." Frankfurter Rundschau

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