Geoffrey Hayes

  • When Little Bunny can't sleep because "there's too much dark at night," it's up to Papa to find just the right night-light for his little bunny. The pair go for a walk around the woods and Papa points out the possibilities. Perhaps the moon is the ideal night-light? Or maybe the fireflies will be able to help? Or even the little glowworm? Featuring luminescent nighttime illustrations and a comforting text, this bedtime story will resonate with little bunnies and their parents.

  • "Punchy dialogue and compact sentences should make this a read-aloud delight."--Publishers Weekly"Part-slapstick, part-fairy tale, the gently humorous plot has enough twists and turns to keep newly independent readers engaged."--School Library JournalFred the dragon has a list of tasks he must complete in order to be a successful dragon--none of which comes naturally. But he's determined to make #5--eat people--work. Before you can say "pass the salt" he's gobbled up three people even though he doesn't have the stomach for it. Luckily a local shepherd, with the help of a giant and a witch, knows how to cure what ails him and get those pesky people out of his belly. It's happily-ever-after for everyone in ways you'd never expect.
    Geisel award-winning author/illustrator Geoffrey Hayes is a stepped reader maestro. The common threads between his wildly popular Uncle Tooth and Otto SIRs and the more recent Benny and Penny series (Toon Books) are clear and constant. The art is adorable, the characters are bursting with personality, and the stories are humorously subversive. From marauding pirates to misbehaving mice to a dragon who swallows people whole (and then continues to communicate with them in his belly!), Geoffrey always hits that sweet spot for the stepped reader audience--easy to decode, illustrative tales that tickle the funnybone.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • A new addition to the premier first chapter book. When Otto gets lost in a deserted fun house, he discovers that it has been invaded by ghosts who once were a band of cutthroats and thieves. Will Otto find the secret exit in time or will he be trapped inside forever?

  • Illustrated in black-and-white. When a creepy fortune-teller moves into Boogle Bay, spooky things start happening. One by one, people disappear, and those who remain begin acting very oddly. Otto is convinced that zombie monsters are up to some sneaky tricks--he even spotted one skulking by the movie theater! Will the swamp zombies take over the town before Otto, his Cousin Olivia, and their Uncle Tooth solve the mystery and save everyone?



  • Benny est un courageux pirate qui navigue, intrépide, sur la mer immense. Quelle fière allure il a, juché dans la boîte en carton qui représente son navire ! Seulement voilà : sa petite soeur Penny, qui ne veut pas comprendre que c'est pour de faux, s'entête à venir l'embêter parce qu'elle veut qu'il joue avec elle (et en plus, elle réclame des câlins !). Quelle petite peste ! Franchement, pour un pirate, ce ne serait pas très sérieux.

    Devant l'insistance de Penny (et aussi, il faut bien l'avouer, les encouragements de Maman.), Benny finit pourtant par consentir à une partie de cache-cache. Tellement pleine de surprises et de rebondissements que c'est la petite Penny qui mettra en fuite cette grosse libellule agressive qui menaçait de les attaquer ! Plein de remords, et ému par le courage de sa petite soeur, Benny finira par avouer que quand il la traitait de petite peste. c'était pour de faux !

    Et comme dans toutes les bonnes histoires, tout est bien qui finit bien : par un gros câlin !

    Sur commande
  • Many have questioned the wisdom of the international intervention in Afghanistan in light of the escalation of violence and instability in the country in the past few years. Particularly uncertain are Canadians, who have been inundated with media coverage of an increasingly dirty war in southern Afghanistan, one in which Canadians are at the frontline and suffering heavy casualties. However, the conflict is only one aspect of Afghanistan's complicated, and incomplete, political, economic, and security transition. In Afghanistan: Transition under Threat, leading Afghanistan scholars and practitioners paint a full picture of the situation in Afghanistan and the impact of international and particularly Canadian assistance. They review the achievements of the reconstruction process and outline future challenges, focusing on key issues like the narcotics trade, the Pakistan-Afghanistan bilateral relationship, the Taliban-led insurgency, and continuing endemic poverty. This collection provides new insight into the nature and state of Afghanistan's post-conflict transition and illustrates the consequences of failure. Co-published with the Centre for International Governance Innovation

  • Terry Copp's tireless teaching, research, and writing has challenged generations of Canadian veterans, teachers, and students to discover an informed memory of their country's role in the Second World War. This collection, drawn from the work of Terry's colleagues and former students, considers Canada and the Second World War from a wealth of perspectives. Social, cultural, and military historians address topics under five headings: The Home Front, The War of the Scientists, The Mediterranean Theatre, Normandy/Northwest Europe, and The Aftermath. The questions considered are varied and provocative: How did Canadian youth and First Nations peoples understand their wartime role? What position did a Canadian scientist play in the Allied victory and in the peace? Were veterans of the Mediterranean justified in thinking theirs was the neglected theatre? How did the Canadians in Normandy overcome their opponents but not their historians? Why was a Cambridge scholar attached to First Canadian Army to protect monuments? And why did Canadians come to commemorate the Second World War in much the same way they commemorated the First? The study of Canada in the Second World War continues to challenge, confound, and surprise. In the questions it poses, the evidence it considers, and the conclusions it draws, this important collection says much about the lasting influence of the work of Terry Copp. Foreword by John Cleghorn.

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